The content of this blog, including my art and worksheets, are copyright protected. I do give permission to reproduce for personal and classroom uses a reasonable, limited amount of my content. You do not need to contact me to ask for permission. All other use is forbidden. For more details see the permissions and restrictions statement in the footer.

Sunday, August 4, 2019

How To Paint a Picture of a Covered Bridge in a Landscape

Free how to paint a picture of a covered bridge in a landscape, an art lesson, and a printable watercolor worksheet.


This is a good practice project and skill builder for any young artist or beginner.

Teachers and parents will be able to use this in class or as a do at home project. It can be a lesson by itself or an extra activity.

FIRST, A WORD OF ENCOURAGEMENT
Learning to paint takes time and patience. Paint every day and experiment with techniques and before long you will not believe what beautiful paintings you are making. Come back and try some of my other projects.

HOW TO PRINT THE FREE WORKSHEET BELOW
  • With some printers, you can just highlight it and send it to your printer.
  • Some printers work better if you copy and paste the image into a Word Document then print as you would normally. (If you get a small image just adjust the margins from the page layout in the toolbar, then drag the image to enlarge it.)
  • Some printers work better if you first drag the image to your desktop and print from there.
 Remember to set your printer to color.

If you have problems printing see the "HOW TO PRINT" tab above or try one of the updated links below that should print better.

These are free to print but your small gift will help me keep this blog going, Choose your gift amount.

How to Paint a Landscape With a Covered Bridge Lesson and Worksheet by MrAdron


Here are two updated links that may print better.

CLICK HERE for a JPEG file in photo format.

CLICK HERE for a PDF file. (If it does not print when you click on the icon then you may have to download a temporary file by clicking the down-pointing arrow in the toolbar, next open the file by clicking on the box at the bottom of your screen, or your downloads folder, and then print by clicking on the printer icon or as you would normally.)

PRINTABLE ART LESSON NOTES.

BEGINNINGS
Trace the design onto 140-pound watercolor paper, this is the heavy paper that will not buckle. If the paper is too thick to trace through place it against a window with the light shining behind it and then you should be able to trace it easily.

SKY AND CLOUDS
Wet the paper all around the clouds. Be careful to not cross into the clouds. Mix some watery blue and lay it into the background. Keep the blue pale at the hills and a little darker at the top. LET IT DRY then wet the clouds and drop in some watery light-blue and watery blue-black. Use a small brush to move the color around to make the shape of the clouds. Let the bottom of the clouds disappear into the sky.

For more color you can add a little watery rose or yellow to the clouds it will give them a summer afternoon look.

HILLS
Wet the hills but not the trees, then brush in some light browns and greens for the hills. After the hills dry dab with a brush the light green for the distant trees.

TREES
Use green for the trees but drop into the green some darker greens made of black and green for the shadows. Make the foreground darker than the hills. Dabb darker dots of green around the base of the hills and in places to give it texture.

RIVER
Start with blue then add black for the shadow below the bridge. After it dries add green and brown for the deeper water but keep some blue showing in places.

BRIDGE
Use brown and grey for the river bank. The road can be grey black brown or clay red.

Use the tip of your brush to paint the bridge, think of it as drawing with a brush. Use grey for the roof and red for the sides. After it dries go back and add more detail and shadow with black and red for the shadows.
ROAD
The road can be grey black brown or clay red.

FINISHING TOUCHES
Use clear water and tissue to "Lift Out" any color that is too intense. Dabb dots of darker color to give texture and richness.

Sign your work about an inch up from the bottom that way there is room for the frame.

Thank you for visiting my blog.  I hope this project is fun and helpful for you. 

To find more like this use the search box above, or choose one of the favorites in the sidebar.  I am sure you will find one you like.

Use the share buttons below to share this, Thank you.

(c) Adron Dozat 8/4/19

Sunday, July 14, 2019

How to Paint a Picture of a Conch Shell

Free how to paint a picture of a conch shell, an art lesson, and a printable worksheet.


This is a good practice project and skill builder for any young artist or beginner.

Teachers and parents will be able to use this in class or as a do at home project. It can be a lesson by itself or an extra activity.

FIRST, A WORD OF ENCOURAGEMENT
Learning to paint takes time and patience. Paint every day and experiment with techniques and before long you will not believe what beautiful paintings you are making. Come back and try some of my other projects.

HOW TO PRINT THE FREE WORKSHEET BELOW
  • With some printers, you can just highlight it and send it to your printer.
  • Some printers work better if you copy and paste the image into a Word Document then print as you would normally. (If you get a small image just adjust the margins from the page layout in the toolbar, then drag the image to enlarge it.)
  • Some printers work better if you first drag the image to your desktop and print from there.
 Remember to set your printer to color.

If you have problems printing see the "HOW TO PRINT" tab above or try one of the updated links below that should print better.

These are free to print but your small gift will help me keep this blog going, Choose your gift amount.


How to Paint a Picture of a Conch Shell, Lesson and Worksheet By MrAdron


Here are two updated links that may print better.

CLICK HERE for a JPEG file in photo format.

CLICK HERE for a PDF file. (If it does not print when you click on the icon then you may have to download a temporary file by clicking the down-pointing arrow in the toolbar, next open the file by clicking on the box at the bottom of your screen, or your downloads folder, and then print by clicking on the printer icon or as you would normally.)

PRINTABLE NOTES.

BEGINNINGS
Trace the design onto 140-pound watercolor paper, this is the heavy paper that will not buckle. If the paper is too thick to trace through place it against a window with the light shining behind it and then you should be able to trace it easily.


BACKGROUND
Wet the paper all around the shell. Be careful to not cross over into the shell. Mix some watery blue and lay it into the background. Mix a little red and black for the shadow below the shell.

LET THE BACKGROUND DRY BEFORE YOU GO ON.
Wet the brown areas with clear water. Mix brown and dab the color into the shell to give it a texture. Mix yellow-brown and dab some in for interest. Let the colors blend. Mix a VERY LITTLE black into the brown and dab in for the shadows. Add more color to the bottom so it looks round.  You may need to tilt the paper so the colors run down from the light area.
LET IT DRY BEFORE YOU DO THE PINK PART

THE PINK PART.
Wet the area for the pink part. Mix a very light red, it is best if you have crimson but regular will do if you have it. Place the red-pink color into the top of the shell starting at the bottom edge of the top. Work the color up so it becomes paler near the top. Use a tissue if you need to lift some color out. It may help if you tilt the paper so it flows down to deepen the color.

DETAILS
Mix a watery lavender-red and put just a little where the shadows of the wrinkles are on the pink area.

If the spurs need a little more shadow then mix a small amount of black with brown and lavender and carefully add shadows where needed.

Mix a little darker brown and dab rows on the side, do not make the rows straight but give them a slight curve to help the shell to look round.

Sign your work about an inch up from the bottom that way there is room for the frame.

Thank you for visiting my blog.  I hope this project is fun and helpful for you. 

To find more like this use the search box above, or choose one of the favorites in the sidebar.  I am sure you will find one you like.

Use the share buttons below to share this, Thank you.

(c) Adron Dozat 7/14/19

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

How To Draw a Baby Dragon

How to draw a baby dragon worksheet for the young artist.


FIRST, A WORD OF ENCOURAGEMENT:
Learning to draw takes practice so do not give up if your project does not turn out the way you had hoped it would. Your frustration is a good sign and shows that you have the talent and you know how you want your picture to look like. You only need to get your skill up to the level of your talent. So draw every day and soon you will be making beautiful pictures. Come back to my blog often and try some of my other projects.

HOW TO PRINT THE FREE WORKSHEET
  • With some printers, you can just highlight it and send it to your printer.
  • Some printers work better if you copy and paste the image into a Word Document then print as you would normally. (If you get a small image just adjust the margins from the page layout in the toolbar, then drag the image to enlarge it.)
  • Some printers work better if you first drag the image to your desktop and print from there.
If you have problems printing see the "HOW TO PRINT" tab above.

These are free to print but your small gift will help me keep this blog going, Choose your gift amount.


How to draw a baby dragon worksheet By MrAdron
Everybody wants to draw dragons, but a baby dragon just out of the shell is really cool!

Start with a bunch of circles to create the body, arms, legs, and head. Remember that the knees and elbows go toward each other. Then connect them with some lines.

Draw lightly so you can erase later. Remember the heads of baby animals are larger than normal.

Baby birds have small wings so I gave my baby dragon small wings too.

I wanted to draw baby horns on him but they looked like ears, maybe you can do better.

Dragons come in every color. Add the details like scales eyes and teeth. Put the shells on each side of him and have them all cracked.

Trace your pencil drawing in a fine tipped pen and then color it in.
Other ideas: How about a nest, brother dragons, a mama dragon looking down on him or a thread of smoke coming out of his nose? Some draw dragon eggs with spots try glitter paint? 
(c)Adron Dozat

Saturday, May 25, 2019

Advice to a Young Art Teacher.

Some ideas and suggestions for teaching art to homeschool students and at summer camps.

A young college student asked for advice on giving art lessons at a summer camp, here is some of what I suggested to him. I hope it is helpful to all. You are welcome to print this page or bookmark it.

I am glad to give you any help I can.  I am excited about your project and all the good you will do for the kids.

The most important thing- number one- and above all else for me as a Christian is to have God in my life and in the things I do. It is my approach to everything to start with prayer.
  • I ask God to show me what HE wants to teach the kids.
  • I ask God to be the teacher through me.
  • I ask God to give me insight into the hearts of each child.
  • I ask God for patience.
  • I ask God for ideas.
  • I surrender my will to God.
  • I give my weakness to God.
Before I even start I thank God ahead as an act of faith for the blessings he is going to give.
I believe I can confidently say that God has abundantly answered these prayers. I have students who have won awards, sold their art, and one was commissioned to illustrate a book because God is first.

Organizing the Class:
In my class format for the older kids, I start with a two or three-minute inspiration. I say, "Artist need inspiration and my inspiration today is ..." and I will go on with a Bible verse that talks about something that relates to art or the subject we are drawing that day. You can get ideas for the inspiration at one of my blogs;

http://spectrumartlessonplans.blogspot.com/  go to the sidebar that lists 2011 posts and there are some there to give you ideas, or you may use them verbatim if you like.

For the younger kids, I bring in God a little different, about halfway through the class I will tell them it is time for a "Mental Recess" or time for a "Thought Break," and then tell one of the Bible stories. I ask them to relax and try to see the story in their minds, and then tell the story in as much detail as possible. This has an added effect of exercising their imagination.

I find it very important and helpful to have a written plan, if I don't I will miss out on something.  I keep it on a clipboard or clipped to the front of my sketchbook.

I find I use my sketchbook a lot during the class. I draw illustrations as I talk or as I go around to each of the kids, I set my sketchbook down next to their picture and draw the drawing they are working on and show an idea or approach to the project they are working on.

In my class we work on several projects each day and it is frustrating when the kids lose them- I don't know how, when they didn't leave the room their work disappeared, so especially for the younger ones get some system to store their work until they leave, cubbyholes or a file folder or shelf with their name on it. It can be a heartbreak to Little Susie to lose her work because Johnie took it by accident, and it was Susie's best piece.

We all have different styles of teaching I go around to each kid from one end of the room to the other and look at their work giving every child praise first, later on, I offer gentle suggestions. I have to remind myself that the kids work is not my work it is their picture and if they want the sun to be a black dot and it is OK with them then fine as long as I am succeeding in giving them skills so that if they want to make the sun flaming fire they can do it. I will say, "It is your picture and it is OK if you want to do it this way but if it was my picture I would do it this way...(I do a little illustration in my sketchbook).

I arrange the tables in a half circle around the subject. That way I can roam around and encourage the kids.

My Lessons:
Have a goal. My goal is to teach realistic drawing from real life with an emphasis on observation skills.

You should ask students what they want to draw if it is monster trucks work it in during the week. Ask the parents what they would like to see the kids do and try to work it in during the week.

You can find my lessons at  http://spectrumartlessonplans.blogspot.com/  The older ones are more developed. I set up this free blog so the parents will have something to print if they needed to show the state the level of education the kids were getting. You are welcome to borrow use or copy anything there.

After the inspiration, I already wrote above. I start out with a "warm up." Athletes, musicians, dancers and other disciplines warm up so it is a good idea to do it now and it gives an opportunity to introduce principles of drawing that are not so exciting. My warm ups are intended to be 7 or 10 minutes in total. I have at most 4 assignments. It may be circles, cubes, lighting bolts, zigzags scribble art of an animal, shadowing, drawing a man in silhouette, drawing a mouse with scribbling only, or anything that relates to the main project of the class, you get the idea.  Some of the warm-ups may be practice about how to hold the pencil in a different way. The kids have been told to hold pencils "just so" with thumb here and fingers there for penmanship but like a hammer, you can hold it different ways so some of my warm-ups I have the kids hold the pencil at the middle like "picking up a worm" or at the eraser end.

One thing I do that the kids seemed to really like was called the "Quick Sketch Challenge." It is so popular that if I don't do it the kids ask for it. I really, really encourage you to try it. Basically, you put something simple like a vase or coffee cup down and tell them they have 7 minutes to draw it! This frees them up to overcome mental blocks. One thing is you have to do it too or they won't respect you.

I find the kids love to show the drawings they have done before the class so I ask early in the class if anyone has drawn something the last week that they want to show. I always give praise, even if it is not at all recognizable or well done. (One kid with a learning disability would literally scribble on a paper and show it off, I wonder if he was testing me). Some times I could find nothing really praiseworthy but would say, "Those lines have a lot of energy!" Or "You use a lot of textures in all the right places." "I really like your use of shadow." After they show their work be ready to show your recent work to them and talk about it.

I bring a few things that I have found at yard sales and Good Will Stores for the kids to draw. Sometimes I bring in some toys left over from my kids younger days. I look for interesting things. I find I have to remind myself not everyone has my taste; for example, I am not into sports but I have to bring in sporty things for those who are. Girls like to draw kittens and ponies so I bring something for them but some dragon or superhero thing for the boys. I give the kids options every day. I am asking the kids to bring in some things to draw like a favorite toy.

I have built a library of pictures and I bring in a folder every day with a lot of pictures that they can use for inspiration or to copy. Look for old advertisements, and catalogs (J.C. Penny is a favorite of mine for their quality of portraiture). Old magazines are good, and old calendars are a good source for pictures. If you get the Sunday paper look for the Parade magazine, the cover usually has a good picture of a person and inside is usually good for one or two pictures. Travel magazines and homemaking magazines are a good place for pictures. Call relatives or ask facebook friends for old magazines and calendars with pictures, they will be grateful to clean out their closets. You can use leftover material for glue on projects.

I always have a main project for the day. I set it up as a still life or a floral or something and talk a little about it why it is a good thing to draw, how to draw it etc. If it is something boring to them I remind them professional artist have to take assignments to draw things that seem boring too. Then I just go around for an hour encouraging the kids. I draw it too.

If the weather is nice we will go outside and draw the flowers or something but you have to have a good plan beforehand; know exactly where you are going, and exactly what you are going to draw. Count heads before and after.

I always work on something about drawing people. Since we are made in the image of God I can't think of something more worthy to draw. One idea is to get pictures from the sports section of the newspaper or magazines of athletes and the kids can practice drawing them. Another idea is to have one student or a parent can pose for the class. A few may say they want to draw fantasy people like anime but I remind them they need to know the rules before they can break the rules so know how to draw a real face makes the fantasy face superior. Newspapers have many faces I cut them out and bring them to class.

Communication:
Teaching is communicating. Learn to use the words the students understand. If you are going to talk about hue, value, chrome, etc. then have a hand out to give them. I usually avoid "art-speak" and use normal words. When you are trying to describe something use simple illustrative words. Instead of saying draw a crooked line say, "Draw a line like a large letter C." or "Draw a line shaped like a rainbow." Instead of saying draw a series of chevrons say, "Draw the letter V over and over," instead of saying draw a scalloped line say "Draw a line like a letter M over and over."

Long-term Project
I have had a "Long term project" for most years. It has been to illustrate a story and each day I give the kids two or three sentences of the story to illustrate at the end of the semester they have the story all illustrated and they are proud to show it off. It has been part of the Take Home Paper I give the kids that have a summary of the class. A long term project I am considering for my class next year will be a poster that in one scene tells a story, it could be in cells like a comic book or a single scene that is self-explanatory. Each day we will do one aspect until it is complete at the end it will be a trophy project the parents will boast about to friends.

An example may be David and Goliath.

      Day one- Concept and Design, research with rough drafts. (David small, Goliath big. His face this way, pose crouched. Enemy army in shadow? or in detail? Horizon, low or high? etc.)
      Day two- developing details, of figures, background, the light values, sketch, etc.
      Day Three- pencil in the figures.
      Day Four and Five- ink in figures, watercolor figures, and background
      Day Five- mat and mount.

End of Day
Always end with encouragement to the group as a whole and to individuals. Think of things you can thank the students for, especially if they were helpful in some way. Respect and value will build rapport and earns the right to be heard.

I always have a hand out of a take-home project that I call a "skill builder." IT is something they may do if they want, you can see some at my other blog, http://drawinglessonsfortheyoungartist.blogspot.com/
You can copy any you want, or they may give you ideas for making your own.

For my home school group, I organized an art show at the library which is free in Howard County. You may not have time to do the library but maybe you know a church that will let you have a reception on Saturday night or display the students work in the fellowship hall or some other place.  It is important to have the experience of showing your work, and very exciting. Have moms volunteer to bring snacks. If you are part of an art association or community ask if two will come to give a presentation of awards.

There are some books at the library on how to draw and how to teach drawing. I have used them in the past for ideas. I don't remember the names but you may find some resources there. If you type how to draw (then name something) in the internet browser you get millions of hits.

I hope this is helpful.

Adron.